Back to School Time in Michigan – How Will We Fare in Terms of Juvenile Crime?

As experienced Michigan criminal defense attorneys, we realize that juvenile crimes occur throughout the year, whether during summer months or while school is in session. However, considering the number of school shootings around the nation in recent years, it’s understandable that many parents become anxious and worried when a new school year begins. school-bus-red-light-655548-m.jpg

While the possibility that a student (or any juvenile, for that matter) could come inside one of Michigan’s schools and start shooting is certainly something to be concerned about, there are other juvenile crimes that are far more common, including drug offenses, assault and battery, and disorderly conduct. Bullying has become a huge problem across the nation as well. Parents should be concerned, but if you are the parent of a juvenile who commits a crime, it can be particularly stressful.

With the new school year just under way, it’s hard to judge how our state will fare in terms of juvenile crime for the 2013-2014 term. However, if you are concerned that your child may misbehave in some way or even participate in something illegal, there are warning signs which may indicate your child is at risk of juvenile delinquency. These signs include:

  • Children who are experiencing divorce or parental separation
  • Children who have learning disabilities or emotional disturbances but who do not get the appropriate support
  • Children who witness verbal abuse or domestic violence in the family
  • Children who identify with or “hang out” with friends who are a bad influence
  • Children living in poor conditions or neighborhoods
  • Abused children
  • Children whose parents, caretakers, or other family members abuse alcohol or drugs
  • Children who are not involved socially, and who lack hobbies and interests

In the mid 1990s, zero tolerance policies became popular as part of the Gun Free School Act. Since that time, additional legislation has been adopted by Michigan which results in suspension for some offenses which do not involve firearms. While this legislation was meant to increase school safety, it has resulted in students (particularly African Americans, those with disabilities, and Latinos) being suspended or expelled for non-violent, minor offenses.

Later this month a statewide summit which focuses on Michigan’s school to prison pipeline will be hosted by the Department of Education, Department of Human Services, Chief Justice Robert Young, and Justice Mary Beth Kelly. This summit will be represented statewide in an effort to focus on how these issues can be controlled in each individual county.


Hopefully the new school year will end with more positive results in terms of juvenile crimes.

If your child is accused of committing a crime, take action immediately. Contact a capable Michigan criminal defense attorney who is skilled in juvenile crimes.